Well, This Sucks

I’ve been listening to a lot of Japanese music lately at work courtesy of J1 Radio, in particular their Gold channel which plays some really, really good oldies. No translation needed; the music alone is fantastic.

Although I have to admit that a lot of words are becoming more familiar to me, like “toki doki” (sometimes), “watashi” (I), and “kawaii” (cute). Anyway…

When I hear a song I really like, I’ve gotten into the habit of copying-and-pasting the artist and song title into an email draft and at the end of the day (or couple of days, depending on how well I can manage the list), sending it to my personal address.

From there, I’ll look them up on the YouTube and add them to a playlist. But therein lies the problem.

The issue I was having is that the songs were presented on J1 in Romaji, or the Romanization of the Japanese syllabary.

Example: searching for Mayuzumi Jun “Tenshi no Yuwaku” — my current song obsession — might only yield a few results because most users would have uploaded the video in its traditional Japanese using the combination of Hiragana, Katakana, and Kanji.

In short, this: 使の誘惑 黛ジュン

Here’s the song and oh, it’s a good one. It’s been stuck in my head for a while and the video is so freaking retro it kills me.

But here, finally, was the problem. Many searches returned absolutely nothing when using Romaji and being I’m not fluent in Japanese nor would have any clue on how to translate the title properly, there was no hope for some of the songs I wanted to find and add to my ever-expanding “Japanese Classics” playlist.

What a bummer.

But today at work I accidentally found the solution to my problem. The site has a page where you can request a song and of course with that, you’d have to know the artist and/or title. What I discovered was that they maintain an A-Z database of artists they play on the station. So if I were to request the song above, I’d look up the singer’s name under the M category. All of her songs J1 plays would be listed under her name.

So I did just that. I found her along with her name and the song title in proper Japanese characters. But being I already had it on my playlist, I opted to search for one that I couldn’t find on the YouTube using Romaji.

I picked one I know I couldn’t find with Romaji, copied the Japanese title, and searched for it on the YouTube.

BINGO. Found. Then I tried another. BOOM. Score.

This was becoming all too easy and I was happy. I added those few I had found to my playlist and couldn’t wait to go home when until I finally had some quiet time in the evening to finish up my search.

With the kid to bed at 9pm, it was time to look at those emails and apply my new-found method of searching so that I could a) finally add them and b) have a good ol’ time doing it.

I had just started to read one of the emails and began seaching, adding whichever version of the song(s) I preferred to my playlist since I was now getting multiple results for each song. I would have been there all night doing it if it were my choice.

And it was all going so well…before the site went down for maintenance and, as of this post, is still down.

(UPDATE 5/7/16: it was back this morning. Yay!)

Grrrrr. So just when things were falling into place, I get shot down. Hopefully it goes back online real soon so I can continue my searching.

At least this little unexpected outage gave me time to write and less time on Facebook which I’m trying to avoid again. Less time on Facebook has also given me time in the evening to workout and study Spanish so it’s definitely working out.

And if I keep up all this working out, I’ll have to expand my Workout Playlist. After all, who wouldn’t want to workout to “Sexual Violet No. 1”?

I know I would!

 

I’ll Never Part With You

IMG_20130902_155345Me and my old iPod Video have been through a lot. Heck, I remember the day I bought it and how, up to the minute I walked to the register to pay for it, I was still contemplating buying the Zen Vision:M (but they were out of stock).

But in the end I felt I had made the right choice, especially after seeing a coworker’s face beam with jealousy after showing it to her – she was still using one of those old music-only models with the LCD display in 2006.

I’ve had my share of accessories for it including a Timex watch that, with the dongle inserted into the charging/data dock, allowed me to control the music as well as volume from the watch (the music controls being limited to skipping and rewinding). This would have been great if I was into running at the time, but did come in handy on those road trips we took with it.

Flash-forward to when I bought my first iPod Touch. Once I was taken in by everything this nifty little gadget could do, my old iPod Video started collecting dust in the drawer, rarely to see the light of day. Why should it? All it did was play music. It had no WiFi, no apps (although I did have Tetris on it when Apple actually sold games for it via iTunes), a small screen, and was bulky. From that point on, it pretty much because useless.

But I refuse to get rid of it, even if Apple has made deleting songs from it such a monumental task. In fact I had to download different software to do it since Apple virtually bricked this thing with the latest iTunes “upgrade”.

This iPod is ugly, it’s clunky, but it’s in near-pristine condition due to the great care its owner gave it. From Day 1, it’s been wrapped in a thin plastic protective sheet and then encased in a hard plastic case for further protection. The silver backing is practically scratch-free save for the few marks I left on it when changing the battery, something that is darn near impossible with the new iPods.

And I still love the thing.

So much so that selling it is the furthest thing from my mind. It’s not worth the time or trouble to do it anyway. Here’s what Best Buy is offering for it as part of their trade-in program:

ipod

It doesn’t matter if this thing was touched by the hand of God and signed by him/her in gold ink, they wouldn’t give me a dime for it. I checked Amazon and the going rate is around $16 provided it meets their criteria. And eBay? Pfft. $30, tops. That’s exactly $1 per gigabyte of storage.

To me, it’s just not worth my time to go out of my way to sell the thing when the sentimental value I have in it far outweighs anything anyone is willing to give me for it. Not only that, it’s still cool to bring out and use now and then for nostalgic purposes even if the nostalgia is only 7 years old.

Yes, my current iPod does more than this one and my phone does even more than both. But even so, I’m holding on to this classic piece of technology for as long as I can and continue to use it as I see fit.

Well, that’s until Apple decides it doesn’t want to support it anymore…